loxx

Possible RSI [Loxx]

Possible RSI is a normalized, variety second-pass normalized, Variety RSI with Dynamic Zones and optionl High-Pass IIR digital filtering of source price input. This indicator includes 7 types of RSI.

High-Pass Fitler (optional)
The Ehlers Highpass Filter is a technical analysis tool developed by John F. Ehlers. Based on aerospace analog filters, this filter aims at reducing noise from price data. Ehlers Highpass Filter eliminates wave components with periods longer than a certain value. This reduces lag and makes the oscialltor zero mean. This turns the RSI output into something more similar to Stochasitc RSI where it repsonds to price very quickly.

First Normalization Pass
RSI (Relative Strength Index) is already normalized. Hence, making a normalized RSI seems like a nonsense... if it was not for the "flattening" property of RSI. RSI tends to be flatter and flatter as we increase the calculating period--to the extent that it becomes unusable for levels trading if we increase calculating periods anywhere over the broadly recommended period 8 for RSI. In order to make that (calculating period) have less impact to significant levels usage of RSI trading style in this version a sort of a "raw stochastic" (min/max) normalization is applied.

Second-Pass Variety Normalization Pass
There are three options to choose from:

1. Gaussian (Fisher Transform), this is the default: The Fisher Transform is a function created by John F. Ehlers that converts prices into a Gaussian normal distribution. The normaliztion helps highlights when prices have moved to an extreme, based on recent prices. This may help in spotting turning points in the price of an asset. It also helps show the trend and isolate the price waves within a trend.


2. Softmax: The softmax function, also known as softargmax: or normalized exponential function,  converts a vector of K real numbers into a probability distribution of K possible outcomes. It is a generalization of the logistic function to multiple dimensions, and used in multinomial logistic regression. The softmax function is often used as the last activation function of a neural network to normalize the output of a network to a probability distribution over predicted output classes, based on Luce's choice axiom.


3. Regular Normalization (devaitions about the mean): Converts a vector of K real numbers into a probability distribution of K possible outcomes without using log sigmoidal transformation as is done with Softmax. This is basically Softmax without the last step.


Dynamic Zones
As explained in "Stocks & Commodities V15:7 (306-310): Dynamic Zones by Leo Zamansky, Ph .D., and David Stendahl"

Most indicators use a fixed zone for buy and sell signals. Here’ s a concept based on zones that are responsive to past levels of the indicator.

One approach to active investing employs the use of oscillators to exploit tradable market trends. This investing style follows a very simple form of logic: Enter the market only when an oscillator has moved far above or below traditional trading lev- els. However, these oscillator- driven systems lack the ability to evolve with the market because they use fixed buy and sell zones. Traders typically use one set of buy and sell zones for a bull market and substantially different zones for a bear market. And therein lies the problem.

Once traders begin introducing their market opinions into trading equations, by changing the zones, they negate the system’s mechanical nature. The objective is to have a system automatically define its own buy and sell zones and thereby profitably trade in any market — bull or bear. Dynamic zones offer a solution to the problem of fixed buy and sell zones for any oscillator-driven system.

An indicator’s extreme levels can be quantified using statistical methods. These extreme levels are calculated for a certain period and serve as the buy and sell zones for a trading system. The repetition of this statistical process for every value of the indicator creates values that become the dynamic zones. The zones are calculated in such a way that the probability of the indicator value rising above, or falling below, the dynamic zones is equal to a given probability input set by the trader.

To better understand dynamic zones, let's first describe them mathematically and then explain their use. The dynamic zones definition:

Find V such that:
For dynamic zone buy: P{X <= V}=P1
For dynamic zone sell: P{X >= V}=P2

where P1 and P2 are the probabilities set by the trader, X is the value of the indicator for the selected period and V represents the value of the dynamic zone.

The probability input P1 and P2 can be adjusted by the trader to encompass as much or as little data as the trader would like. The smaller the probability, the fewer data values above and below the dynamic zones. This translates into a wider range between the buy and sell zones. If a 10% probability is used for P1 and P2, only those data values that make up the top 10% and bottom 10% for an indicator are used in the construction of the zones. Of the values, 80% will fall between the two extreme levels. Because dynamic zone levels are penetrated so infrequently, when this happens, traders know that the market has truly moved into overbought or oversold territory.

Calculating the Dynamic Zones

The algorithm for the dynamic zones is a series of steps. First, decide the value of the lookback period t. Next, decide the value of the probability Pbuy for buy zone and value of the probability Psell for the sell zone.

For i=1, to the last lookback period, build the distribution f(x) of the price during the lookback period i. Then find the value Vi1 such that the probability of the price less than or equal to Vi1 during the lookback period i is equal to Pbuy. Find the value Vi2 such that the probability of the price greater or equal to Vi2 during the lookback period i is equal to Psell. The sequence of Vi1 for all periods gives the buy zone. The sequence of Vi2 for all periods gives the sell zone.

In the algorithm description, we have: Build the distribution f(x) of the price during the lookback period i. The distribution here is empirical namely, how many times a given value of x appeared during the lookback period. The problem is to find such x that the probability of a price being greater or equal to x will be equal to a probability selected by the user. Probability is the area under the distribution curve. The task is to find such value of x that the area under the distribution curve to the right of x will be equal to the probability selected by the user. That x is the dynamic zone.

7 Types of RSI
See here to understand which RSI types are included:

Included:
  • Bar coloring
  • 4 signal types
  • Alerts
  • Loxx's Expanded Source Types
  • Loxx's Variety RSI
  • Loxx's Dynamic Zones

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